Concluding Reflection for the Effective Communications Module

With a blink of an eye, we have come to the end of our first trimester in SIT. Looking back since the start of the Effective Communications Module, I have to say that the journey has been nothing short of a fruitful one. Reflecting upon the goals I set out for at the start of this module, I am very impressed with what I have achieved.

A goal I set myself for was to develop confidence in my public speaking skills. I felt that the little things such as reading from the projector helps us students to be more vocal and venture out of the box. That exposure enabled us to understand our vocal abilities and in a way, force us to project out voices. Classroom sessions also helped us to be more vocal in communicating out thoughts on different matters each week which is essentially the essence of this module.

I am very fortunate to have Professor Blackstone as my class instructor. He has the flair of making each session engaging and enjoyable. His attitude towards grammar made us realize the need to scrutinize our content and make the additional effort in editing our own way of writing. This is a valuable lesson which I will apply in my projects to come.

Being a part of the Annual SIE Presentation Showcase was definitely a good exposure for me. I had the privilege of not only presenting in front of my fellow colleague but professionals of the industry. Although nerve wrecking as it may be, I found joy in sharing my research and experience with others. I was glad that I managed to pull of some jokes and I learnt from my mistakes. Given a choice, I would have gladly do it all over again.

In conclusion, I felt that the Effective Communication Module had groomed me to be more confident person as I feel more empowered than before to step out of my shell. I’ll like to thank all tutors for their commendable effort in making this module a success for me and others.

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Improved Executive Summary for Report

This proposal describes a research project done by the A-Team. The proposal consists of the problem identified, the proposed concept as well as the evaluation of the product and its applicability at the Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT) Dover Campus. To support the credibility of the report, A-Team conducted first hand observations as well as a survey from the student and staff population of the school.

In this proposal, A-Team addresses the issue of time wasted by students and staff members in looking for seats in the canteen during lunch hours. As a result, the quality of their break is affected as students and staff members have to rush through their meal due to the limited time remaining.

This proposal will discuss in-depth A-Team’s solution to this problem which is to introduce a mobile application based on smart sensor technology to influence individuals to dine at a less crowded canteen. This will then help application users to identify vacant seats within the two canteens without having to waste time looking for seats.

Oral Presentation Critical Analysis

I felt I did well for the oral presentation. Through the written comments from my peers, they mentioned how engaging it was and they felt that the idea was communicated to them fluently. For starters I felt that the correct approach for such a presentation was to begin with the right mentality. Although there is always a nerve wrecking sensation that comes with giving presentations, I found comfort in the words of Carmine Gallo, author of “TALK LIKE TED”. She raised her point that in order for a presentation to be effective, the presenter must be confident of himself has well as the product he is presenting. In addition, Carmine shared that even though the product may not be the best available in the market, as long as the presenter himself is convinced and believes wholeheartedly in that particular project, he can deliver a good presentation. With that being said, I made it a point to emphasize and remind myself that “Hot Seats” indeed is a wonderful product which can enhance the lives of both students and staff population of Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT). Therefore, my aim during the class presentation was to sell this idea and make them feel what I feel.

I felt that the pace and choice of words used were effective in pitching the idea to my fellow colleagues. I have also noticed the use of hand gestures to emphasise a point helps to compliment a statement you want your audience to hear. I found this to be an effective tool when I used them to emphasize the amount of time wasted for students with only an hour of lunch break.

One aspect I felt needs improvement would be the use of more catchy images under the introduction segment of the presentation. I felt it was an opportunity wasted as certain slides in the presentation failed to deliver that punch which I thought would have made a great difference to the audience. Perhaps pop up effects for images could be used to compliment the point I wish to convey to the audience which makes it easier for them to visualize and relate to the content.

Improved Reader’s Response Draft 3

In the article “3D building models help bring sustainability into construction”, Jenkins (2015) discusses the effectiveness of building information modelling (BIM) as well as the challenges of implementing it. The introduction of BIM has revolutionized the building and construction industry.  According to Monswhite (as quoted in Jenkins, 2015), the change of use from two to three-dimensional design with BIM enables the industry to reduce construction costs and optimise space management.  While BIM boasts advantages, Jenkins asserts that BIM is yet to be widely accepted in the building and construction industry. This is supported by Charlton, chief of consultancy Space Group, who argues that majority of the key players in the project lack collaboration and refuse to accept changes due to their preference towards traditional methods (Jenkins, 2015). In addition, Jenkins also cited from Coventry University’s sustainability director, Smithson, who states that these key players are unwilling to explore the functions of BIM. As a result, Smithson and her team operate the immersive simulation centre to educate industry professionals about the uses of BIM and its benefits. Although the article suggests “stubborn preference to traditional methods” has hindered the progress of integrating BIM in the buildings and construction industry, there are other factors contributing to BIM not being universally accepted.

One factor affecting the universal implementation of BIM is its inability to be fully accommodated and integrated with crucial systems used by industry professionals into a single software. While the BIM software remains relatively new in the market, they are constantly being reworked and improved by software manufacturers (InfoComm International, no date). To complicate matters, the lack of standardization in building protocols for the software has resulted in poor compatibility of functions and uses of BIM. This is supported by Rezgui (2014), who states “available protocols do not concurrently consider the enabling technology and the variables affecting its deployment on projects such as interoperability required for different BIM work-streams and the alignment of the BIM work streams with the country specific policy context.”

At the same time, key stakeholders traditionally rely heavily on their own industry specific software to generate crucial information (Kivits & Furneaux, 2013). As a result of BIM’s current limitations, the lack of interoperability to integrate these functions into a single sophisticated model discourages companies from using the software in their projects.

Another factor affecting the universal implementation BIM is the high cost of investment. It is imperative that organizations have strong IT facilities to compliment this sophisticated software so as to fully optimize its benefits (Liu, Xie, Tivendal, & Liu, 2015). According to a report by InfoComm International, existing software such as computer aided design (CAD) can be operated on laptop whereas BIM requires expensive high specification workstations to function (InfoComm International, no date). In addition, further investments are required to train employees to be proficient with the software. This is supported by Carlin (2010), who states that due to the ever-changing advancement of technology, users of BIM have to undergo constant upgrading to keep tabs with the latest features and functions to improve productivity. Therefore, the high cost of equipment and training requires companies to evaluate their financial position and make careful considerations before purchasing the BIM software.

In conclusion, although the issue of interoperability within the BIM software and its high cost have deterred companies from implementing BIM, cost arguably remains the biggest challenge for organizations. Poor current economic projections have forced organizations to take precautionary measures to reduce spending. In addition, small to medium enterprises (SME) of the industry may not have the financial capability to purchase such an expensive product. Therefore, companies should carefully review their financial statuses and decide if their current position allows them to invest in such software.

 

 

References

Carlin, E. M. (2010, October 12). The Legal Risks of Building Information Modeling (BIM). Retrieved on October 6, 2017 from http://www.constructionlawnowblog.com/design-and-technology/the-legal-risks-of-building-information-modeling-bim/

InfoComm International. (no date). Building Information Modeling, 11-12. Retrieved on October 3, 2017 from https://www.infocomm.org/cps/rde/xbcr/infocomm/Brochure_BIM.pdf

Jenkin, M. (13 April, 2015). 3D building models help bring sustainability into construction. Retrieved on September 25, 2017 from The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2015/apr/13/bim-technology-design-business-sustainability-construction

Kivits, R. A., & Furneaux, C. (2013). BIM: Enabling Sustainability and Asset Management through Knowledge Management. The Scientific World Journal Vol 201314. Retrieved on October 5, 2017 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/983721

Liu, S., Xie, B., Tivendal, L., & Liu, C. (2015). Critical Barriers to BIM Implementation in the AEC Industry. International Journal of Marketing Studies; Vol 7, No.6, 163-164. Retrieved on October 4, 2017 from http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ijms/article/view/55355/

Rezgui, Y. (2014). Building Information Modelling: Protocols for Collaborative Design. Journal of Information Technology in Construction, 24. Retrieved on October 5, 2017 from http://www.itcon.org/papers/2014_7.content.00672.pdf

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Technical Report Draft 1

Background

As students of Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT), we have noticed that the Canopy canteen at the Dover campus is often packed with students and staff between 12 p.m. till 2p.m. daily. Given that student’s lunch breaks are mostly an hour, it is often a struggle to enjoy a meal without the pressure of time before the next lesson begins. A survey was conducted among 27 students showed that 60% of the respondents indicated that they spend approximately 5 to 10 minutes every day circling within the canteen of their choice looking for seats. These results are not inclusive of time taken to walk between crowded canteens searching for available seats as well as time taken queueing up for food. As such, it has become A-Team’s interest to develop a solution to help reduce unnecessary wastage of time.

The 3 canteens Canopy Café, iEat and the Crown Coffee at SIT Dover campus offer a total seating capacity of ____. Canopy canteen has proven to be the preferred lunch venue for students as statistics show that 78% of respondents chose the canteen due to its affordability and wide selection of food. As a result, Canopy canteen becomes overcrowded during lunch hours and patrons tend to spend a considerable amount of time circulating the canteen searching for seats.

Although an additional canteen that is identical to the Canopy canteen could be a possible solution to address the issue of an overcrowding canteen. It may not be feasible due to the high cost of construction incurred by the institution as well as the restriction of limited space within the Dover campus. Therefore, A-Team has come up with an alternative solution which aims to manage crowd control within canteens. This is done by providing real time information of the available seats in each specific canteen so as to influence the decision of students and staff members on whether they should dine at that canteen.

Purpose Statement

The aim of this report is to propose to the estate management of SIT to approve the installation of sensors at the 3 canteens at Dover campus. This report includes; benefits of implementing this system, cost of implementation, stakeholders involved and its impacts, limitations as well as solutions to address the issues raised.

Problem Statement

Instead of wasting time on finding seats at an overcrowded canteen, students and staff members should be able to determine the available seats before patronizing the canteen during peak periods. During lunch hours, students and staff members often waste a substantial amount of time looking for seats in the canteen. There is a need to introduce an mobile application that indicates to users the location of available seats in SIT canteens at a specific point of time to influence students and staff members to patronize a less crowded canteen.

 

Reader’s Response Draft 3

 

In the article “3D building models help bring sustainability into construction”, Jenkins (2015) discusses the effectiveness of building information modelling (BIM) as well as the challenges of implementing it. The introduction of BIM has revolutionized the building and construction industry.  According to Monswhite (as quoted in Jenkins, 2015), the change of use from two to three-dimensional design with BIM enables the industry to reduce construction cost and optimise space management.  While BIM boast advantages, Jenkins asserts that BIM is yet to be widely accepted in the building and construction industry. This is supported by Charlton, chief of consultancy Space Group, who argues that majority of the key players in the project lack collaboration and refuse to accept changes due to their preference towards traditional methods (Jenkins, 2015). In addition, Jenkins also cited from Coventry University’s sustainability director, Smithson, who states that these key players are unwilling to explore the functions of BIM. As a result, Smithson and her team operate the immersive simulation centre to educate industry professionals about the uses of BIM and its benefits. Although the article suggests “stubborn preference to traditional methods” has hindered the progress of integrating BIM in the buildings and construction industry, there are other factors contributing to BIM not being universally accepted.

One factor affecting the universal implementation of BIM is its inability to be fully accommodated and integrated crucial systems used by industry professionals onto a single software. Due to its relatively new nature in the market, software manufactures are constantly working to improve the BIM software (InfoComm International, no date). To complicate matters, the lack of standard modern building protocols when constructing the software has resulted in poor compatibility of functions and uses of BIM. This is supported by Rezgui (2014), who states “available protocols do not concurrently consider the enabling technology and the variables affecting its deployment on projects such as interoperability required for different BIM work-streams and the alignment of the BIM work streams with the country specific policy context”.

At the same time, key stakeholders traditionally rely heavily on their own industry specific software to generate crucial information (Kivits & Furneaux, 2013). As a result of BIM’s current limitations, the lack of interoperability to integrate these functions into a single sophisticated model discourages companies from using the software in their projects

Another factor affecting the universal implementation BIM is the high cost of investment. It is imperative that organizations have strong IT facilities to compliment this sophisticated software so as to fully optimize its benefits (Liu, Xie, Tivendal, & Liu, 2015). According to a report by InfoComm International, existing software such as computer aided design (CAD) can be operated on laptop whereas BIM require expensive high specification workstations to function (InfoComm International, no date). In addition, further investments are required to train employees to be proficient with the software. This is supported by Carlin (2010), who states that due to the ever-changing advancement of technology, users of BIM have to undergo constant upgrading to keep tabs with the latest features and functions to improve productivity. Therefore, the high cost of equipment and training require companies to evaluate their financial position and make careful considerations before purchasing the BIM software.

In conclusion, although the issue of interoperability within the BIM software and its high cost have deterred companies from implementing them, cost arguably remains the biggest challenge for organizations. Poor current economic projections have forced organizations to take precautionary measures to reduce spending. In addition, small medium enterprise (SME)s of the industry may not have the financial capability to purchase such expensive product. Therefore, companies should carefully review their financial statuses and decide if their current position allows them to invest in such software.

 

 

References

Carlin, E. M. (2010, October 12). The Legal Risks of Building Information Modeling (BIM). Retrieved on October 6, 2017 from http://www.constructionlawnowblog.com/design-and-technology/the-legal-risks-of-building-information-modeling-bim/

InfoComm International. (no date). Building Information Modeling, 11-12. Retrieved on October 3, 2017 from https://www.infocomm.org/cps/rde/xbcr/infocomm/Brochure_BIM.pdf

Jenkin, M. (13 April, 2015). 3D building models help bring sustainability into construction . Retrieved on September 25, 2017 from The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2015/apr/13/bim-technology-design-business-sustainability-construction

Kivits, R. A., & Furneaux, C. (2013). BIM: Enabling Sustainability and Asset Management through Knowledge Management. The Scientific World Journal Vol 2013, 14. Retrieved on October 5, 2017 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/983721

Liu, S., Xie, B., Tivendal, L., & Liu, C. (2015). Critical Barriers to BIM Implementation in the AEC Industry. International Journal of Marketing Studies; Vol 7, No.6, 163-164. Retrieved on October 4, 2017 from http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ijms/article/view/55355/

Rezgui, Y. (2014). BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING: PROTOCOLS FOR COLLABORATIVE DESIGN PROCESSES. Journal of Information Technology in Construction, 24. Retrieved on October 5, 2017 from http://www.itcon.org/papers/2014_7.content.00672.pdf

Edited on 5 Oct 17

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Reader’s Response Draft 1

In the article “3D building models help bring sustainability into construction”, Jenkins (2015) discusses the effectiveness of building information modelling (BIM) as well as the challenges of implementing it. The introduction of BIM has revolutionized the building and construction industry.  According to Monswhite (as quoted in Jenkins, 2015), the change of use from two to three-dimensional design with BIM enables the industry to reduce construction cost and optimise space management.  While BIM boast advantages, Jenkins asserts that BIM is yet to be widely accepted in the building and construction industry. This is supported by Charlton, chief of consultancy Space Group, who argues that majority of the key players in the project lack collaboration and refuse to accept changes due to their preference towards traditional methods. In addition, Coventry’s University sustainability director, Smithson, states that these key players are unwilling to explore the functions of BIM. Therefore, Smithson and her team operates the immersive simulation centre to educate industry professionals the uses of BIM and its benefits. Although the article suggests “stubborn preference to traditional methods” have hindered the progress of integrating BIM in the buildings and construction industry, there are other contributing factors to why BIM has yet to be universally accepted.

A barrier to implementing BIM is due to its high cost of investment. It is imperative that organizations must have strong IT facilities to compliment this sophisticated software so as to fully optimize its benefits (Liu, Xie, Tivendal, & Liu, 2015). According to a report by InfoComm International, existing softwares such as computer aided design (CAD) can be operated using laptop whereas BIM require dedicated high specification workstations to operate  (InfoComm International, no date). In addition, further investments are required to train employees to be proficient with the software. This is supported by Carlin (2010), which states that due to the everchanging advancements of technology, users of BIM have to undergo constant upgrading to keep tabs with the latest features and functions to improve productivity. Therefore, the high cost of equipment and training involved in implementing BIM require smaller companies to evaluate their financial position and make proper considerations to before purchasing the software.

Although BIM is an advance piece of technology, it has yet to fully accommodate and integrate the wide spectrum of systems used by industry professionals. Due to its relatively new nature in the market, many software manufactures are constantly upgrading BIM softwares in seek to further improve it (InfoComm International, no date). In addition, key stakeholders remain heavily reliant on their own specific softwares to generate results as current BIM softwares lack interoperability to integrate these functions into a single sophisticated model (Kivits & Furneaux, 2013). This lead to inconsistency and incompatibility of different existing softwares.   To further complicate matters, lack of modern building protocols resulted in little standardization of concepts and uses in the software. This is supported by Rezgui, which states “available protocols do not concurrently consider the enabling technology and the variables affecting its deployment on projects such as interoperability required for different BIM work-streams and the alignment of the BIM work streams with the country specific policy context”(Rezgui, 2014).